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Wednesday, September 4, 2013

PERU NATIONAL DISH


PERU
Gastronomy has always been a huge part of the Peruvian lifestyle.
Each region's cuisine is not just subtly different - it's a whole new ball game. From the rich and sweet delights of the coast to the spicy treats and creamy cheeses of the highlands, there's a wealth of variation in Peruvian cooking that ensures there's always something new to try. It means that at every step on your holiday in Peru there is a new delicacy to check out, and the national dish is one of the "must-try" dish in your list while visiting Peru. 

Ceviche 

Peruvian Ceviche

Ceviche is a seafood dish popular in the coastal regions of the Americas, especially Central and South America. There is no dish more Peruvian than ‘Ceviche’. It is considered the national dish and thought of as unrivaled by any other dish anywhere else in the world, for the way it’s prepared and for its taste and with this, it gives Peru a place on the world map of gastronomy. The dish is typically made from fresh raw fish marinated in citrus juices, such as lemon or lime, and spiced with ají or chili peppers. Additional seasonings, such as chopped onions, salt, and coriander, may also be added. Ceviche is usually accompanied by side dishes that complement its flavors, such as sweet potato, lettuce, corn, avocado or plantain.

In Peru, ceviche has been declared to be part of Peru's "national heritage" and has even had a holiday declared in its honor. The classic Peruvian ceviche is composed of chunks of raw fish, marinated in freshly squeezed key lime or bitter orange (naranja agria) juice, with sliced onions, chili peppers, salt and pepper. Corvina or cebo (sea bass) was the fish traditionally used. The mixture was traditionally marinated for several hours and served at room temperature, with chunks of corn-on-the-cob, and slices of cooked sweet potato. 

Regional or contemporary variations include garlic, fish bone broth, minced Peruvian ají limo, or the Andean chili rocoto, toasted corn or cancha and yuyo (seaweed). A specialty of Trujillo is ceviche prepared from shark (tollo or tojo). Lenguado (sole) is often used in Lima. The modern version of Peruvian ceviche, which is similar to the method used in making Japanese sashimi, consists of fish marinated for a few minutes and served promptly. It was developed in the 1970s by Peruvian-Japanese chefs including Dario Matsufuji and Humberto Sato. Many Peruvian cevicherías serve a small glass of the marinade (as an appetizer) along with the fish, which is called leche de tigre or leche de pantera.

Source: [1] 


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